Monday, March 30, 2015

A Not-So-Little Trick for TRUE Happiness

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GPS for the Soul - The Huffington Post

A Not-So-Little Trick for TRUE Happiness

Happiness... where does it truly live?



Have you ever found yourself so wrapped up in your goals, dreams and milestones that you begin to buy into the belief that happiness can only be achieved once your goals are reached?



The dream career

The fairy tale romance

The million dollar paycheck



You convince yourself that your happiness, and sometimes even your identity and self worth, is defined by the things you strive for, and the milestones you reach.



With this kind of belief system in place...it's no wonder it's so difficult to LET GO of the NEED for your dreams, goals and achievements to come to fruition.



Today's episode of Weekly Alignment revolves around a hot topic that is discussed in every corner of the self-help world...and for many people, it's the topic that allows them to begin exploring the TRUE meaning of happiness.







If you liked today's episode, please share it with the friends you love most! Also, be sure to subscribe to our YouTube Channel so you don't miss any of the upcoming episodes!



Weekly Alignment with Jenn Lederer presents a weekly web series with a satirical look on Spirituality, Entrepreneurship and the world of Self-Help.



Have a question or topic you'd like us to discuss on the show? Tweet us your idea with the hash tag #WeeklyAlignment!



Until next week...



Be inspired,

~ Jenn Lederer




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Many young Indian women underweight, their babies too: research

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Parenting/Kids News Headlines - Yahoo! News

Many young Indian women underweight, their babies too: research

A woman sleeps with her baby on sidewalk at a market in MumbaiBy Alisa Tang BANGKOK (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Researchers have long puzzled over why children in India, despite being wealthier, are shorter and smaller than children in sub-Saharan Africa. At least part of the answer may be a patriarchal society that puts young women on the lowest rung of the social ladder, according to a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). Delhi-based economist Diane Coffey found that maternal health in India is worse than previously believed, and that 42.2 percent of Indian women of childbearing age are underweight. "In India, young, newly married women are at the bottom of household hierarchies, and have even lower social status than older women," said Coffey, a doctoral student at Princeton and visiting researcher at the Delhi School of Economics.






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Exclusive Photos: See Why Dancing's Michael and Peta Are the Goofiest Pair

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Animal and Pets News Headlines - Yahoo! News

Exclusive Photos: See Why Dancing's Michael and Peta Are the Goofiest Pair

Exclusive Photos: See Why Dancing's Michael and Peta Are the Goofiest PairDancing with the Starscontestant Michael Sam might be a big, tough football player, but he's not above enjoying cucumber facials with his partner Peta Murgatroyd. In our exclusive photos, the duo takes us behind the scenes from spas and selfies to Week 4's run-through. Check them out! ... Read More > Other Links From TVGuide.com Dancing with the Stars Michael Sam Peta Murgatroyd






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10 nutritionists share McDonald's meals they'd order

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CNN.com - Health

10 nutritionists share McDonald's meals they'd order







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Teletubbies-Joy Division Mashup Will Give You Nightmares

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Weird News - The Huffington Post

Teletubbies-Joy Division Mashup Will Give You Nightmares

TV's "Teletubbies" have always had a sort of stoner appeal to them, but this new video might be more of a bad trip.



The clip shows the characters from the beloved British TV show in black and white, and set to the funereal tune of "Atmosphere" by Joy Division.



The mashup was put together by Christopher G. Brown, a Boston-based musician and member of Vary Lumar, after an eerie black-and-white photo of the Teletubbies went viral last week, and some remarked online that it looked like something out of the Joy Division video.



Here's the original video for "Atmosphere," directed by Anton Corbijn, for comparison:







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Sunday, March 29, 2015

'Smart' Headlights Use Eye-Tracking To Beam Light Where Drivers Look

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Good News - The Huffington Post

'Smart' Headlights Use Eye-Tracking To Beam Light Where Drivers Look

From self-driving cars to drunk driver-detecting lasers, researchers are using technology to help make the road much safer.



And now, engineers at General Motors (GM) are developing "smart" headlights that beam light precisely where a driver is looking -- an invention that could improve visibility for drivers at night.



"We want to actually implement the idea that the human eye is capable of guiding and regulating light," Ingolf Schneider, director of lighting technology at GM's subsidiary Opel manufacturer headquartered in Rüsselsheim, Germany, told Opel Post. "The eye tracking principle relies on tracking via camera and intelligent analysis of eye movements using a special algorithm."



How it works. The eye-tracking system is made up of a single dashboard camera equipped with infrared sensors. The camera scans the driver's eyes and other points on the face more than 50 times per second. Based on the scanned data, electronic motors then change the direction of the headlights.



An algorithm built into the eye-tracker adjusts for quick glances, so that the light doesn't dart around with every movement of the eye, Discovery News reported. And, no matter where a driver looks, the headlights always illuminate the road in front of the car.



“Another major benefit is that the eye-tracker doesn’t have to be individually calibrated for a particular driver," Schneider said in a written statement. "The system works perfectly with anyone behind the wheel, no matter what their size.”



As the eye-tracking headlights are still in the early stages of development, the concept will likely take several years to be implemented.




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Death to Multitasking

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GPS for the Soul - The Huffington Post

Death to Multitasking

I love going to Mexico. For every task, there is a "guy" who does it. They do not have jack-of-all-trades handymen. If you are working on your house, you do not call one person, but have to contact a separate plumber, electrician, and painter. And it is not just about home repairs. If you need your shoes shined, there is a guy for that. Our Mexican friend would never consider shining her own shoes; it is not her role, and she would be taking away someone else's job. She looks at us with a quizzical face when we talk about how much we do on our own. If you need a key made in Mexico, you don't go to Ace but to the locksmith. If you need supplies for dinner, you have to make three stops to the carnicería (butcher), the tortillera (tortilla bakery), and verduleria (vegetable market). For every task, there is a specialist, a professional who gets it done. But not in America, we do it all ourselves.



We are a country of over-responsible, over-committed, overwhelmed multitaskers.



work frustration



Our professionals are not specialists but generalists accepting every challenge given to them. As individuals, we are not focused on just one role but many. Now with the advent of technology, we have the ability to do everything ourselves, and we do. Neuroscientist Daniel J. Levitin points out, "Thirty years ago, travel agents made our airline and rail reservations, salespeople helped us find what we were looking for in shops, and professional typists or secretaries helped busy people with their correspondence. Now we do most of those things ourselves." Think of all you can do at your fingertips: order groceries to be delivered, create your own business cards, research apartment listings, create an ad to sell items, and a host of other tasks. As I write this post, I am also having a conversation with my sister on Facebook and watching an online auction (and because of this, the article is taking three times longer to write). We pride ourselves on doing everything ourselves all at once. Adding technology's constant connectivity and expectation of immediate response to this ability to do more ourselves, becomes a recipe for disaster.



Our brains are not wired to do as much as we are. We are not built to handle multiple projects at once. We think we can be at the same time mother-professional-philanthropist or do at the same time driving-texting-parenting, but we can't. What is actually happening is we are rapidly switching between each role or task. And every time we switch, we are producing more cortisol, the stress hormone that clouds our mind, messes with the functioning of our brain, and negatively affects our physical body. According to Glenn Wilson, professor of psychology at Gresham College, multitasking reduces cognitive abilities more than smoking marijuana does. Our multitasking is hurting us.



Maybe it is time to slow down.



On our visits to Mexico, we immediately experience a slower way of life. No one is rushed, unless they are a visiting Gringo. People have time to talk and connect. The locals work hard but they are not frantic. Expectations of the community are realistic. No one is expected to be a superhero. No one is responsible for everything. Everyone focuses on their job, then walks away and focuses on their life. Things get done while allowing individuals to live.



Why not try it for a day, or just an hour. Instead of expecting to be able to respond to everything coming your way, why not see if you can focus on only one thing at a time. Turn off your phone and email. Release every other obligation and thought. See how focused attention can not only create better results, but also provide more calm and peace in your life.



To help you release your multitasking ways and in honor of April being National Stress Awareness month, sign up to win a copy of From Type A to Type Me.




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Swiss authorities target 'live cell' injection clinics

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Health News Headlines - Yahoo News

Swiss authorities target 'live cell' injection clinics

Swiss health regulators announced March 26, 2015 they have launched a criminal probe into clinics suspected of giving clients potentially dangerous animal cell injections as part of anti-ageing treatmentsSwiss health regulators announced Thursday they have launched a criminal probe into clinics suspected of giving clients potentially dangerous animal cell injections as part of anti-ageing treatments. The investigation targets private clinics and people who have illegally offered the injections which are particularly popular among wealthy Chinese, Middle Eastern and Russian nationals, said the Federal Office of Public Health (OFSP).






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15 Ways Your Environment Makes You Eat More (Or Less)

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Health and Fitness - The Huffington Post

15 Ways Your Environment Makes You Eat More (Or Less)

science of us

By Melissa Dahl

Follow @melissadahl



Brian Wansink, the best-selling author and Cornell professor of nutrition science and consumer behavior, has made a career out of studying the ways people accidentally eat more than they intended to. His work examines how environment shapes eating behavior, and how our human predilection toward mindless eating doesn't have to mean overeating. In an entertaining interview with Mother Jones, Wansink takes us through what almost reads like a rundown of his greatest hits -- some of the most interesting findings his research has uncovered on the ways we can use mindlessness to improve our eating habits. Here are some of our favorites.



Science of Us: Where Skinny People Sit In Restaurants



In a restaurant:



Ask to be seated by a window. Wansink’s data show diners who eat next to a window are 80 percent more likely to order salad.



And if you’re trying to avoid sweets, don’t sit at a booth near the bar -- according to Wansink’s research, people who sit in that location are 73 percent more likely to order dessert.



Choose a brightly lit restaurant with soft background music and you’ll enjoy your meal more -- you’ll also consume fewer calories.



Order whatever it is you actually want. "If you tell people to be mindful of what they order, they don't like it as much and they make up for it later," Wansink told Mother Jones. "They tell themselves they deserve ice cream since they virtuously ate a salad for dinner."



Wansink’s research even shows some very specific rules to remember should you find yourself dining at a Chinese buffet: Eat with chopsticks. Choose a smaller plate. Survey the entire buffet before making your selections. Don’t sit close to the buffet, and make sure you’re facing away from the food.



Science of Us: Your Personality Could Be Making You Fat



At home with the kids:



Serve fruit in colorful bowls. Wansink’s research on schoolchildren has found that kids eat double the amount of fruit when it’s served in a colorful dish, as compared to a plainer, metal one.



And cut up their fruit first. Again, in his research in schools, Wansink observed that when schools served sliced apples, 48 percent fewer apples were thrown out without being eaten.



Improve on vegetables’ #branding. Wansink’s data show that kids can be tricked into eating 35 percent more veggies when their veggies are given funny names (X-Ray-Vision Carrots! Silly-Dilly Green Beans!).



Science of Us: Why Smart People Fall For Weight-Loss Scams



At the grocery store:



Spend at least 10 minutes browsing the produce section. Wansink says people who do end up buying more fruits and veggies than shoppers who speed their way through the produce aisles.



Buy the cheaper, bigger box of cereal. Just make sure to divide it up into small containers at home; people tend to eat less when food is served out of a smaller container, according to Wansink’s research.



It’s okay to buy the bagged salad. "Purist cooks say, 'You're a lazyhead. You should be doing this yourself.' That's what my wife says,” Wansink told Mother Jones. “But when she's not around, it's often what I buy. It makes me a whole lot more likely to have a salad, because it takes three steps out of the process."



More from Science of Us:

How French Women Combat Cellulite

What A Neuroscientist Said About Jon Stewart's Brain

Why Alcoholics Anonymous Works




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Slum kids confront sexism as India grapples with abuse of women

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Parenting/Kids News Headlines - Yahoo! News

Slum kids confront sexism as India grapples with abuse of women

By Nita Bhalla MUMBAI (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Standing before a classroom packed with teenagers, Yojana Salunke begins her weekly one-hour lesson on a subject which many experts say is crucial to helping India address one of its biggest challenges - gender inequality. As India grapples to stem rising violence against women, activists say classes like these - which confront traditional gender roles and challenge sexism amongst the youth – are key to changing attitudes and curbing widespread gender abuse. We talk about how boys and girls are equal as human beings, but how we treat girls differently," said Shakir Parvez Shaikh, 15, a student at the Shahaji Nagar Municipal Hindi School in Mumbai's Cheeta Camp area. I didn't realize before ... I think it's unfair." BARRAGE OF THREATS From female feticide, child marriage and dowry killings to rape and domestic violence, Indian girls and women face a barrage of threats, say experts, largely because of age-old patriarchal attitudes that view them as inferior to men.




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